Skip to main content

Jim Harbaugh Thinks He'll Finish His Career At Michigan

Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines reacts during the college football game against the Michigan State Spartans at Michigan Stadium.

ANN ARBOR, MI - OCTOBER 17: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines reacts during the college football game against the Michigan State Spartans at Michigan Stadium on October 17, 2015 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Spartans defeated the Wolverines 27-23. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Jim Harbaugh only has one season at Michigan under his belt, but there are already whispers about his longevity at his alma mater.

CBS Sports writer Dennis Dodd believes that Harbaugh's "shelf life" at a job is about four years. After Harbaugh stormed out of a recent press conference, he was criticized by Jim Rome, who called him "miserable," and that he "runs way too hot." Harbaugh had a fantastic response to Rome, but the point stands: a lot of people don't think the Harbaugh-Michigan marriage is built to last.

Jim Harbaugh isn't one of them though. During a spot on Sirius XM College Sports, Harbaugh was asked if he "legitimately" sees himself coaching Michigan for the next 20-25 years, essentially the rest of his career.

According to The Detroit News' Angelique Chengelis, he was quick to answer.

“Yeah, I think that way,” Harbaugh said.

“And I think, God willing and the creek don’t rise, that will happen. I love coaching, I love football, I love the University of Michigan and you hope to go as long as you can where you’re still doing it by example, not just through anecdote, and you’re still able to do that as long as the good Lord will allow you to do it.”

It is true that Harbaugh hasn't stuck around at any of his jobs long, to this point. However, it isn't a large sample size to go on. Few can say that jumping from FCS San Diego to Stanford wasn't the right move. The same goes for the Stanford to San Francisco 49ers move. Most coaches would make the same jump in Harbaugh's decision. He clearly burned bridges in San Francisco, but the organization deserves at least equal blame in that.

20 years at Michigan may be a bit much, but it could certainly happen. And if Harbaugh is able to deliver a national championship to Ann Arbor and leaves after 10 to hunt for a Super Bowl, few would blame him for the move. Or Harbaugh could stick around for the long haul. Trying to predict it after one season is impossible.

[The Detroit News]