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ESPN's Todd Blackledge Thinks That New CFB Scandals Shine Well On Penn State

Whoa.

Update: Blackledge did later offer some clarification for his earlier statement.

Earlier: College football is filled with scandals right now, to say the least. In the past two months alone, we've heard of rape cases, players receiving impermissible benefits, rampant drug use, players getting in barfights, and who can forget Johnny Manziel's autograph signing investigation?

It seems like every day there are new allegations that arise, and the culture of the game gets more tarnished by the minute. But this morning, one ESPN analyst had a pretty interesting take on the recent scandals, and how they relate to one of the most notable ones in recent memory:

Whoa.

Now, I think Blackledge may get blasted for this comment by a lot of people, but it's important to look at what he's really saying. I don't believe that Blackledge for a second thinks that the Penn State scandal wasn't absolutely horrific. No, I think Blackledge is indicating that PSU's disaster was an administrative one that certainly lacked moral character, but it was not entirely specific to the football program and its players.

With the Sports Illustrated 'The Dirty Game' reports that have been coming out all week, we have seen issues that are allegedly deeply ingrained in the culture of a program -- that a large number of players are aware of and partake in blatant lawbreaking, cheating, and general poor behavior. With the Yahoo! Sports report regarding impermissible benefits last night, we see that these problems exist at many schools, not just one that happens to be the focus of a single, highly publicized report.

What Blackledge is getting at is that the football culture of Penn State is apparently cleaner than that at many other schools. Of course, people may take his opinion with a grain of salt, considering that he is a Penn State alumnus.

It will be interesting to see if he further backs up this statement later or elaborates on it further.