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College Football World Reacts To New Overtime Rules

ATHENS, GEORGIA - OCTOBER 12:  Israel Mukuamu #24 of the South Carolina Gamecocks reacts after his second interception of the game against the Georgia Bulldogs in the second half of their 20-17 second overtime win with J.T. Ibe #29 and R.J. Roderick #10 at Sanford Stadium on October 12, 2019 in Athens, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

ATHENS, GEORGIA - OCTOBER 12: Israel Mukuamu #24 of the South Carolina Gamecocks reacts after his second interception of the game against the Georgia Bulldogs in the second half of their 20-17 second overtime win with J.T. Ibe #29 and R.J. Roderick #10 at Sanford Stadium on October 12, 2019 in Athens, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

College football's overtime rules are changing, albeit slightly, this upcoming 2021 season.

Overtime is one of the best aspects of college football. Each team gets a possession, starting at the opponent's 25-yard line, in a single overtime period.

If the teams remain tied heading into the third overtime, the offenses are required to attempt two-point conversions if a touchdown is scored. That'll change this upcoming season.

Now, instead, teams will be required to attempt two-point conversions starting in the second overtime period. Here's the latest:

"The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel on Thursday approved a change to overtime rules for the 2021 football season," announced the NCAA on Thursday. "Teams will be required to run a 2-point conversion play after a touchdown when a game reaches a second overtime period. Previously, a 2-point attempt was required after the third overtime period."

In addition, the third overtime will consist of alternating two-point conversion attempts as opposed to how it's currently formatted. "Also, if the game reaches a third overtime, teams will run alternating 2-point plays, instead of starting another drive at the opponent’s 25-yard line," the NCAA continued. "This is a change from the previous rule, which started to use 2-point plays in the fifth overtime period." The NCAA is wanting to shorten games that reach overtime. Unfortunately, some aren't a fan of the new overtime process.

On the bright side, college football's overtime process is still pretty much the same. And let's be honest, most games don't go to a third overtime.