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Alabama President Issues Statement On Alcohol Controversy

Fans of the University of Alabama Crimson Tide display their body paint during the game with the Louisiana State University Tigers.

TUSCALOOSA, AL - NOVEMBER 12: Fans of the University of Alabama Crimson Tide display their body paint during the game with the Louisiana State University Tigers on November 12, 2005 at at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. LSU defeated Alabama 16-13 in overtime. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

A recent decision by the City of Tuscaloosa has halted the sale of alcohol at Alabama Crimson Tide football games and all other athletic events.

This week, the city council announced a fee on large events that sell alcohol. For ticketed events of at least 1,000 people, a percentage of sales for each ticket will go toward "public safety fees."

As a result of this change, the University of Alabama announced that it will no longer be selling alcohol in Bryant-Denny Stadium or at any other university venue -- at least until this fee is lifted.

In a statement on Tuesday, university president Stuart R. Bell emphasized how much money the school's athletic programs already bring into the Tuscaloosa community on a yearly basis:

"The University of Alabama supports and appreciates the many public safety officers who work gameday, including UAPD, and City County and State officials.

"UA Athletics and out fans currently pay more in ticket and concession sales taxes than all but one SEC school. Those sales taxes go to support the City, County and State and their officers. The City, County and State also receives significant sales taxes from restaurants, bars, retail outlets and hotels generated by our athletics and campus events. We believe the success of our athletics programs and growth of our university have had a tremendous positive impact on our community.

"The University was surprised by the City's arbitrary service fee. Therefor, the planned new sales at our UA venues will remain on hold as we review the impact this fee could have on our University, Athletics and fans."

Maybe this statement will push the City of Tuscaloosa to alter their decision.