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NCAA Football Oversight Committee Has A Formal Recommendation

Detail of the College Football Playoff National Championship trophy, along with the helmets of the 2 competing teams, Alabama and Georgia.

ATLANTA, GA - JANUARY 07: Detail of the College Football Playoff National Championship trophy, along with the helmets of the 2 competing teams, University of Alabama (left) and University of Georgia (right) on January 7, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)

The only constant in the college football world these days is change (and the SEC a team in the national title game). But more change appears to be on the way following the latest recommendation from one of the sport's top bodies.

On Monday, the NCAA Football Oversight Committee released a new recommendation calling for the elimination of FBS requirements to qualify for conference championship games. The committee argued that college football is the only sport that has such extra requirements. 

As an alternative, the Football Oversight Committee proposed that each conference determine their own method for deciding on title game participants.

Via NCAA.org:

"The Football Oversight Committee recommends that the NCAA Division I Council adopt noncontroversial legislation to remove the FBS requirements that must be met to annually exempt one conference championship contest. This will provide discretion to each FBS conference to determine the method for identifying the participants in its conference championship game. 

Under this proposal, the teams with the best records in their respective conferences would be the conference title game participants. It would eliminate the need for "division winners" as most of the conferences currently have.

Had this change been in effect this past year, we would have seen Michigan vs. Ohio State in the 2021 Big Ten Championship Game. 

It's an interesting proposal to be sure. According to Ross Dellenger of Sports Illustrated, the proposal has overwhelming support from the 10 FBS conferences.

Will we see the complete elimination of college football conference divisions in the coming year?