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Paul Finebaum Reacts To Nebraska's Awful Loss On Saturday

ATLANTA, GA - JULY 18: Paul Finebaum,  of the Paul Finebaum show reacts to a comment on air during the SEC Football Kickoff Media Days on July 18, 2022, at the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta, GA.(Photo by Jeffrey Vest/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

ATLANTA, GA - JULY 18: Paul Finebaum, of the Paul Finebaum show reacts to a comment on air during the SEC Football Kickoff Media Days on July 18, 2022, at the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta, GA.(Photo by Jeffrey Vest/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Paul Finebaum brought the flamethrower to "McElroy and Cubelic in the Morning" on Monday.

Addressing Nebraska's sickening 31-28 loss in Dublin, Finebaum said the program has no one to blame but itself for its ineptitude.

They are in dire straits because everyone is assuming he’s going to get fired and it reminds me a little bit of where Southern Cal was last year. They lost early, they fired Clay Helton and they spent the entire fall looking for a new coach and ended up getting arguably the best hire of the offseason. And I think that’s where [Nebraska AD] Trev Alberts needs to be today. He did the old college try routine by [bringing Frost back], but that program’s too good to be run by someone who makes the wrong decisions at the wrong time.

The ESPN personality continued on, pointing to the Huskers move to the B1G as one of the biggest determining factors for its fall.

I think this has been going on for some time, but you can make the argument that Nebraska hasn’t gone so wrong, they’ve simply become irrelevant. The Big Ten move did not help them. Their national brand has shrunk as others have increased and it’s just not a big deal anymore. Programs come and go. ... Ultimately, you keep making bad decisions and you just simply shrink into oblivion and I think that’s where Nebraska is. It doesn’t have a great geographical base and I think it’s been victimized by the Big Ten move not going very well.

With Saturday's loss, Nebraska became the first major-conference team to lose seven straight games by single digits; an unfortunate theme of the Scott Frost era.