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ESPN Ranks Top 10 'Quarterback U' Programs In College Football

Matt Leinart hugging Steve Sarkisian and Pete Carroll during a college football game.

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 03: Matt Leinart #11 of the USC Trojans celebrates with USC head coach Pete Carroll and other assistant coaches after USC scored a touchdown to take a 52-6 lead in the third quarter against the UCLA Bruins December 3, 2005 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

We've seen plenty of debate in the college football world this week, in lieu of actual sports. Today, ESPN put up a very interesting post.

The Worldwide Leader posted rankings of the "Quarterback U" and "Running Back U" schools. Fans love to debate which programs reign supreme over individual positions. These rankings, especially that quarterback list, should be up for hot debate.

ESPN is weighing in players from the BCS and College Football Playoff eras. The Bowl Championship Series began in 1998.

On the quarterback list, ESPN went with USC at No. 1. The Trojans had a ton of success at the position under Pete Carroll, with guys like Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart having dominant seasons. That may be up for debate, though, given the QB run Oklahoma is on.

ESPN went with the Sooners at No. 2. Sam Bradford was great under Bob Stoops last decade. Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray won back-to-back Heismans and went No. 1 in the NFL Draft. You could also toss in Jalen Hurts' success this year on that pile. The rest of ESPN's list: 3. Oregon Ducks 4. Texas Longhorns 5. Florida State Seminoles 6. Louisville Cardinals 7. Auburn Tigers 8. Florida Gators 9. Texas A&M Aggies 10. Ohio State Buckeyes The main argument is probably down to USC and Oklahoma, but you may be able to make a convincing argument for schools like Louisville and Ohio State, counting 2019 Heisman finalist Justin Fields are under ranked here. [

From the BCS to the CFP era, who's your No. 1 for Quarterback and Running Back U? pic.twitter.com/8tkWmVPKdv

— ESPN (@espn) April 11, 2020

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